25 prints to be donated to Viterbo

By Jessica Schurmann

A&E Editor

Twenty-five prints, donated by the Emilio Sanchez Foundation, will soon be on display on Viterbo’s campus.

Sanchez was an extraordinary painter who had a knack for cap­turing the qualities of light and the structural details of buildings with precision and simplicity. He painted up until the end of his life, even as he struggled with losing his eye­sight in his old age.

Sanchez was fascinated with buildings, especially those in New York City and the tropics. He loved the brightly colored houses in Cuba and Morocco, and would sit outside during the brightest and hottest parts of the day to paint them.

Sanchez began his fascination with the play of color and light on color­ful subjects in Cuba where he was born in 1921. His work in the 1950s began with scenes of New York City, portraits of friends, and tropical paintings. From there Sanchez grew more abstract in his work, creating the minimalistic architectural paint­ings he is well known for.

In the 1970s and 80s he began to travel more, visiting countries throughout the Mediterranean. He has had more than sixty solo exhibi­tions and has work in many private collections and museums including the New York Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Jesús Jambrina, an associate pro­fessor of Spanish and history at Vit­erbo and also the coordinator of the Latin American Studies program, oversaw the donation of the prints.

He told Lumen, “This is a very neat collection we have received. Specialists from the foundation knew about our Latin American Studies program, and they decided that the art prints would be well ap­preciated on our campus. Most of the donation is from artist’s collec­tion on the landscapes of Caribbean islands, but there are also several depicting locations in Boston and New York.”

For now, the prints are waiting to be framed, but they should be dis­played on campus soon for every­one to see.

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